skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

GLOBAL STRATEGIES TO PREVENT VIOLENCE - The Role of the World Health Organization

When Apr 20, 2015
from 06:00 PM to 07:30 PM
Where Room B4, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge
Add event to calendar vCal
iCal

GLOBAL STRATEGIES TO REDUCE VIOLENCE - The Role of the World Health Organization


"2015 is a chance to change history", said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, referring to the post-2015 development agenda. This includes a chance to revolutionise our approach to violence prevention.


The current draft of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals includes "to significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere", to "end abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence and torture against children", and to "promote the rule of law at the national and international levels, and ensure equal access to justice for all". If adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in early 2015, the world community of nations will commit itself, for the first time, to taking concerted global action to reduce violence in all its forms.


The World Health Organization is at the forefront of creating political momentum to reduce violence with evidence-based policies.


On 24 May 2014 the 67th World Health Assembly adopted a historic resolution entitled "Strengthening the role of the health system in addressing violence, in particular against women and girls, and against children". The resolution has taken the 20-year long commitment of the WHO to global violence prevention to a new level: It calls on the WHO to prepare a global plan of action to strengthen the role of the health system in addressing interpersonal violence within the coming two years. Also, the WHO is requested to strengthen efforts to develop the scientific evidence on magnitude, trends, health consequences, and risk and protective factors for violence, to support member states by providing technical assistance, and finalise its global status report on violence prevention.



Learn more about the WHO's global violence prevention strategy from

Dr. Christopher Mikton - World Health Organization, Violence Prevention Technical Officer at the Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability

The talk will be followed by the launch of the report "Global Strategies to Reduce Violence by 50% in 30 Years - Findings from the WHO and University of Cambridge Global Violence Reduction Conference 2014" and an expert discussion with

Prof. Manuel Eisner - University of Cambridge, Director of the Violence Research Centre, Deputy Director of the Institute of Criminology and Professor of Comparative and Developmental Criminology at the Institute of Criminology


The event is followed by a drinks reception.

Free admission.

Join the event on Facebook

All are welcome!


ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Christopher Mikton photoChristopher Mikton has been working in the Prevention of Violence Unit in the Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland, for the past seven years. His work has been focusing on preparing the Global status report on violence prevention 2014; synthesizing evidence and developing evidence-based technical guidelines for the prevention of different forms of interpersonal violence; supporting the prevention of interpersonal violence in developing countries, with a particular focus on child maltreatment prevention; integrating violence prevention into early childhood development programmes; and developing a global information system on violence prevention, called V-Info. He was educated at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom (PhD and MPhil in Criminology) and McGill University in Montreal, Canada (BA). Before joining WHO, he worked as a clinical scientist for the United Kingdom's Ministry of Justice and Department of Health's Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder Programme. In the past, he has also worked for the International Committee of the Red Cross.


ABOUT THE TALK

Title

WHO's Global Strategy for Preventing Violence and the Role of Research and Evidence Within It

Abstract

In this talk, I will describe the violence prevention strategy the World Health Organization (WHO) has been pursuing over the past twelve years - and which is currently in the process of being re-assessed - in light of WHO's main functions and of the development of the broader field of violence prevention. I will focus in particular on the central part played in this strategy by the large scale implementation of evidence-based "programmes". I will also discuss the role of research and evidence in the different components of the strategy - which is central in relation to the normative component (issuing of guidelines) but almost absent in relation to the advocacy and other components. I will try to identify the nature of the research and evidence required to strengthen this strategy and suggest how the University of Cambridge's Violence Research Centre might be able to help. My hope is that participants' comments on this presentation will contribute to the series of consultations WHO is currently conducting to revise its violence prevention strategy.

Download

Download the PDF of the presentation "WHO's Global Strategy for Preventing Violence and the Role of Research and Evidence Within It" by Christopher Mikton

 

ABOUT THE REPORT

Title

Global Strategies to Reduce Violence by 50% in 30 Years: Findings from the WHO and University of Cambridge Global Violence Reduction Conference 2014

Abstract

Global Strategies to Reduce Violence by 50% in 30 Years: Findings from the Global Violence Reduction Conference 2014

Is it possible to cut worldwide levels of interpersonal violence in half within the coming 30 years? This question was at the centre of the first Global Violence Reduction Conference 2014, jointly organised by the University of Cambridge and the World Health Organization. The conference lured experts out of their comfort zone, asking to reflect on big strategies to reduce violence by 50% in the next 30 years. It brought together 150 leading representatives from international organisations, academia, civil society institutions and philanthropic organisations to discuss how scientific knowledge can contribute to the advancement of this violence reduction goal. The main message of the conference was that a global violence reduction by 50% in the next 30 years is achievable if policy makers harness the power of scientific evidence on violence reduction. The report outlines important key policy recommendations from the conference that could contribute to the development of a global road map for reducing violence.

Download the Report

Download the PDF of the report "Global Strategies to Reduce Violence by 50% in 30 Years: Findings from the WHO and University of Cambridge Global Violence Reduction Conference 2014"

The Violence Research Centre (VRC) conducts research to promote the understanding of the causes, the consequences, and the prevention of interpersonal violence. The VRC takes a strong interest in advancing quantitative methodologies for the study of violence and conducts longitudinal studies, experimental studies, programme evaluations, epidemiological surveys, and cross-national comparative studies. The research is done in close cooperation with leading experts from academia, policy-making institutions and civil society organizations.

Violence Prevention News

WHOviolencenews